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show" about a week after 9/11. you remained remember jon stewart said this attack on it happened. it's not a dream, but the aftermath, the recovery is a dream realized and that's martin luther king's dream. whatever barriers we put up our god. even if this is voluntary, any fool can blow something up, but to see these guys come in these firefighters, policemen and people all over the country, literally with buckets rebuilding, that's extort barry and that's why we party one. now 11 years later, we can look at our nation and say it's as divided as it's been in recent memory and maybe we have to concede that some of that unity we experience was, as jon stewart said, just temporary. and that sometimes makes it even more discouraging to watch the spectacle that are national, political system often becomes. but my chapter in "in the shadow of greatness" explains why haven't lost hope. that's because i spent the years surrounding nine elevenths run by people who continue to live that dream and set their differences aside and put themselves in harms way and unfailingly do with their country
disappeared. i first realized this of all places while watching "the daily show," and jon stewart said this attack, it happened. it's not a dream but the aftermath of is, the recovery is a dream realize, and that's martin luther king's dream whatever barriers we put up, to see these guys, firefighter, and policemen from all over the country, rebuilding with buckets. that's extraordinary, and that's why we've already won. 11 years later we can look at our nation and say, well, it's as divided as it's been in recent memory, and maybe he haven't conceived some of the unity we experienced was, as jon stewart said, was just temporary, and that sometimes makes it even more discouraging to watch the spectacle that our national political systems often become. but my chapter of "in the shadow of greatness" explains why i haven't lost hope. that's because i've spent the years since 9/11 surrounded by a group of people who continue to live that dream. and who continue to set their differences aside and put themselves in harm's way, and unfailingly do what thunder country asked of them. and these
feeling frustrated at "newsweek." this was when jon meacham was the editor. they suddenly were feeding like nobody was listening to what they were saying, somehow guys with equal or lesser credentials were getting better assignments, getting faster promotions. but this was a young woman who are raised to believe that you could do it anything and be anything you want to be. and also felt that they were post-feminists. the sex wars were all over, we were all equal now. so it couldn't be discrimination. it must be that they were not good enough, that they just weren't talented enough. and then somebody at "newsweek" in the library who had been a longtime told him that in this case of "newsweek" 40 years ago by the women, which they had no idea about. there was no evidence at "newsweek" anymore about this case. so when my favorite stories is they went on google and googled it, and they couldn't find anything so they felt it's not in google, it must not have existed. [laughter] and then someone gave them susan brown miller's memoir and our time, susan had written some pages about our suits
this at the communication convention, i actually rot a clip of john daly -- jon stewart on "the daily show", really lampooning her speech that she gave after in response to president bush's last state of the union. anybody who has given the response to the state of the union is someone who is perceived as an upper newcomer in the party. it was not well done. i have seen some heads shaking. john stewart had a great time lampooning that speech. and a lot of other people had written about it. from a communication perspective, she was not inspirational. in kansas would bring anything to the ticket for john kerry and i was a lot of what was written in 2004. she's not going to bring a whole lot here. and that was true. flush it is foreign-policy experience. she said really the thing that made a difference in joe biden versus her wasn't foreign-policy experience and she agreed those essential appears to shoot several strikes start, but she's been a very good cabinet secretary. and who knows what that may take her 2016. >> okay. part or i suspect i know who will take the lead him out of nancy kassebaum. >>
presence. six -- since then i have been teaching at universities, going on the jon stewart show. the thing to explain their real danger not just to my life but named from anybody from the book at all was never from random violent individuals always state-sponsored terrorism. the paid profession -- professional assassins. >> and a number of attacks on bookstores. there was a bookstore not just burned to the people going into the bookstores at the publishing company is. and a great tragedy was the translator of the professor that was murdered at his university in japan. and the attempt to murder the norwegian publisher. but this was the war. and all these cases these were professional hits. >> it was not spontaneous the danger was high from the turn of the century when refi they managed to get the iranians to back down. so really most of the danger went away. >> what is the difference between fata and the bounty? how do you deal with that? >> >> nobody has ever taken in this gentleman seriously. even than iran. it is clear he does not have the money. anybody can say $3 billion but if you don
in the partisan with post jon cubic. this is booktv.org with more on this weekend's television schedule. >> booktv's visit to augusta, maine with time warner cable highlight some of the rich literary culture of the area. the city of agusta has evolved from being a trading post in the 1700s to being a magazine publishing hub from the 1800s to the 20th century and also home to harriet beecher stowe, author of uncle tom's kevin. our coverage of the visit continues. >> the only city that actually has a major river and we occupied both sides of the river so we have an east and west side of the river and the river has become a defining point so that is unique. the other thing is what is unique is the state capital, we have access -- we host the state legislature and the governor's mansion and have all the government services you would expect to have with it being the state capital. state capital has its benefits. we are proud of being the state capital. i am sure if you have been to the state government in your backyard, it can pose some difficulties and stresses but we have a good working relationshi
on the jon stewart show. it doesn't seem -- well, that's dangerous. [laughter] no if, i mean, it's -- the thing to explain to you is that the real danger to not just my life, but to all those who remembered the fatwa also named anybody who was involved in the book at all, so it included publishers, translators, booksellers, etc. the real danger was never from, like, random, violent individuals. the danger was always state-sponsored terrorism. it was the paid professional assassins of the iranian state and can its proxies. that was what the danger was. and that was -- >> and there were some attacks. >> and there were, you know, there were a number of attacks, yes. there were attacks on bookstores, there was bookstores in america like cody's bookstore in berkeley, california, was fire bombed, there was a bookstore in london that was fire boxed twice. there were bookstores all over the world that were attacked. and not just burned, but people going into stores and threatening people who worked there and in publishing companies and then -- well, the great tragedy was that the book's
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)

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